The Proper Loading and Unloading Procedure for a Semi-Automatic Pistol…

Safety is paramount. Following the proper loading and unloading procedures is an important part of firearm safety. Follow these steps to keep yourself and everyone around you safe. Please share this video, hopefully this video will serve as an extension of what I teach everyday and keep everyone a little safer. LOADING… 1. Fill the magazine 2. Insert the magazine into the pistols magazine well 3. Manually work the action by racking the slide to charge a cartridge into the chamber 4. If you have a hammer fire pistol with a de-cocker lever, de-cock the hammer If you have a striker fire pistol, you’re done, there’s no de-cocking the hammer as it doesn’t exist  UNLOADING… 1. Remove the magazine 2. Work the action manually by racking the slide to remove the still chambered cartridge 3. Lock the action open with the slide control lever If you have a pistol without a slide control lever, insert a pen into the ejection port to keep it open 4. Visually inspect the chamber to ascertain that it is in fact clear of a cartridge Thanks for reading and sharing, George Caro, Firearms Instructor...

This is old new however, it hasn’t fully made it’s rounds yet.

This is from November 2011, Florida made gun carry laws uniform across the state. Municipalities and counties can no longer come up with their own ordinances, they must all follow a set, uniform Florida law established in 1987 to stop this from occurring in the first place. Now, the courthouse and other governmental faculties as described in the Florida statutes are still off limits. However, every place else is good to go. Here’s a New Times article highlighting the new November 2011 law. Share this, everyone should clearly know and comprehend the law. It’s our responsibility as gun owners....

Firearm Training Varies…

Firearm training differs greatly depending on who you ask. Everyone has a preferred teaching method and that’s perfectly acceptable, there more than one way to accomplish a goal. However, always ask yourself, “will this work for me in a real world scenario?” If it takes too much effort to employ what you’ve learned, then no, it’s not going to work for you. Personally, what I teach, I can substantiate by providing several real working examples that my students can closely relate to. If my students can easily and consistently replicate what they’ve been taught, I’ve done my job correctly. However, if my students were to find any training technique to be non-intuative and difficult to employ in a non-critical situation, then what I’ve taught them wouldn’t really work in a real world situation where fine motor skills fly out the window. My job is to break down the elements of an action in such a way that it’s easily comprehendible and consistently employed in an intuitive manner. I train often and attend industry seminars to keep up on industry standards to make sure I can provide all my students the very best firearm training curriculum offered. George Caro, Firearms Instructor Home...